Belgrade Beer Fest 2013
Liz Loves Belgrade

Liz Loves Belgrade

Liz Loves Belgrade

Liz, an American woman from New york, America, wrote:

Belgrade is not a beautiful city, but was one of my favorites. There is a huge mixture and contrast of architecture, with the above showing a fairly nice neoclassical style building situated next to a dilapidated communist block. Nevertheless, Belgrade has an amazing raw energy to it, and I cannot wait to go back. Apart from Budapest, it was the cheapest city we visited.

For more information about Belgrade, visit the website of the Tourist Organization of Belgrade.

Living the Serbian dream: Serbian food

Living The Serbian Dream: Serbian Food

Living the Serbian dream: Serbian food

Harriet Ruff, a 21-year-old woman from Warsash (UK) living in Geneva, Switzerland decided to visit Serbia:

Telling people that I went to Serbia on holiday generally ensues a series of raised eyebrows and questioned intentions…Serbia is not the third world country that everyone imagines.

Yes, it’s not. Harriet Ruff enjoyed her holiday in Serbia and wrote a great blog post talking quite exclusively about Serbian food. It’s seems that the British woman loved Serbian food. Here is a short excerpt but read the whole blog post:

A palačinke is essentially a pancake or crêpe. Sweet or savoury but with a specific base. Savoury always comes with sour cream. It’s a great addition. And sweet are either a Nutella or Eurocrem base. Eurocrem is a sort of white chocolate and milk chocolate mixed spread. It’s delightful. Plazma are another Serbian great. Apparently biscuits for babies that everybody eats. They’re a cross between a rich tea biscuit and a digestive. Crumble that on a eurocrem palačinka and you are living the Serbian dream.

Serbia - Michael Turtle
Belgrade Bridge Ada
Love Serbia
Belgrade Talking Application

Belgrade Talking Application

Belgrade Talking Application

In a simple, swift, informative and entertaining manner, the Belgrade Talking free application takes its users to more than 30 locations in Belgrade bringing a brand new perception of the capital. After downloading the application, it is enough to point the smart phone camera towards the nearest location and a series of short stories will instantly open; an audio guide will then begin to play making it possible for the users to focus on the architecture of buildings, institutions, monuments, religious facilities and details rather than on the phone screen. The maps which take the users through Belgrade’s past and present provide for pre-planning a tour while the application will propose or guide them along the best sightseeing route, taking into account the site which the user is visiting at the given time. The application is available in both Serbian and English. Good job Telekom Srbija. It’s a great application, and it’s free! So use Belgrade Talking application!

For more information about Belgrade, visit the website of the Tourist Organization of Belgrade.

Elephants
Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

The women behind Nothing Against Serbia’s blog put yesterday an interesting blog post titled Travel tips for Serbia 2013. If you wish to have the best of the Serbian experience, read her post. Here is a short excerpt, but read the full blog post:

The Serbian eating style is something that delights tourists the most: it’s absolutely fantastic! In this overview about serbian food you find an explanation to all the dishes served in restaurants, a good guide to drinks and eating habits. (For vegetarians, well what to say? if you decide to eat meat once in your lifetime, do it in Serbia…)

Today's Anti-Serb Propaganda From Germany

Today’s Anti-Serb Propaganda From Germany

Today's Anti-Serb Propaganda From Germany

Elizabeth Pond, a Berlin-based journalist, wrote an article today over at World Policy blog titled “Serbia Enters Europe: The End of the Bloody Balkan Wars.” It’s not a bad article, but clearly a biased article full of lies and anti-Serb propaganda. She wrote:

…after Slobodan Milosevic’s armed forces drove more than half of the 90 percent Albanian population from their homes and
killed 10,000 of them.

Wrong. Slobodan Milosevic’s armed forces did not killed 10,000 Alblanian in Kosovo. Teams from 17 NATO countries found a total of only 2,108 bodies, Serbs and Albanians. Some had been killed by NATO bombing and some in the war between the UCK and the Serbian olice and military.

And by the spring of 1999 and at the time of the Rambouillet Talks there were only a few hundred Kosovo Albanians who had not returned home. What Elizabeth Pond does not say is that the return of the Kosovo Albanians to their homes paved the way for the cleansing of 250,000 Serbs from Kosovo after 10 June 1999 in full view of 30,000 NATO troops. What Elizabeth Pond does not say is that 6,000 Serbs were killed in Kosovo after the war between June 1999 and December 2000.

At the end of her article, Elizabeth Pond also went on to wrote that “In addition, Serbs in the north, instead of shooting at Kosovo police to keep out alien “occupiers…” Serbs shooting at Kosovo police? A rather biased view of Serbs in Kosovo is again presented. Albanians have driven out and attacked counless Serb families and Serbian kids in Kosovo in recent years. I wrote about that again, and again.

Well, I recommend you to read this great blog post titled WHEN AND WHY DID THE ETHNIC CLEANSING BEGIN? to know more about what really happened in Kosovo. There you can read that the United States was looking for an excuse to bomb Serbia and had already formed plans in August 1998. U.S. Senate Republican Policy Committee, August 12, 1998:

Planning for a U.S.-led NATO intervention in Kosovo is now largely in place…. The only missing element seems to be an event – with suitably vivid media coverage – that would make the intervention politically salable.

Media coverage and lies. That’s it. At the end, NATO bombed Serbia during 78 days and killed innocent Serbs: