Brussels Diplomatic: Serbia Is A Lovely Country To Visit

Brussels Diplomatic: Serbia Is A Lovely Country To Visit

Brussels Diplomatic, an emagazine published by Desnerck Media Ltd for EU-affairs, diplomacy and expats in Brussels put last week a great article talking about Serbia. Coralie Devies wrote there that Serbia is a lovely country to visit and points out the rich culture and history of Serbia. Coralie Devies also confirms what we are telling here for years, that Serbian people are truly hospitable and friendly. Well, here is a short excerpt from Brussels Diplomatic’s article but it is worth reading the whole article:

SERBIA: A LOVELY COUNTRY TO VISIT

Serbia is a country in which civilisations, cultures, faiths, climates and landscapes meet and mingle. The variety of scenery and monuments, curative spas, hunting grounds and fishing areas give the basis for Serbia’s tourism.

The cultural and historical heritage of Serbia begins with prehistoric archaeological sites and its legacy from classical antiquity. Perhaps its greatest riches, though, are in the many mediaeval Serbian churches and monasteries. All year round, numerous cultural, entertainment, traditional and sporting events are held in Serbia, demonstrating the creative power and spiritual vitality of this country.

It does not take long for foreign visitors to Serbia to discover the hospitality, kindness, openness and warmth of the country’s residents.

Americans: The Serbs Are Incredibly Friendly And Hospitable

Americans: The Serbs Are Incredibly Friendly And Hospitable

Americans: The Serbs Are Incredibly Friendly And Hospitable

 

Theron Labounty, an American man from Colorado, and Sarah were recently in vaccation in Serbia. They went to Tara National Park and also visited the cities of Novi Sad and Niš. They discoverd what Serbian people really are, friendly, and liked their trip to Serbia. Here is a short excerpt of their blog post titled Adventures in Serbia:

The Serbs are incredibly friendly and hospitable… While we were in Serbia, we visited the cities of Novi Sad and Niš. Novi Sad has a great vibe in its beautiful town center with countless outdoor cafes. They also have a beautiful park along the Danube. Niš has some incredible historical sites. There are 4th century Roman ruins with mosaics comparable to those in Rome. There is a tower built of the skulls of Serbian soldiers by the Turks to celebrate a victory in 1809. Many of the skulls disappeared when family members recognized their fathers, brothers, and sons.

Living the Serbian dream: Serbian food

Living The Serbian Dream: Serbian Food

Living the Serbian dream: Serbian food

Harriet Ruff, a 21-year-old woman from Warsash (UK) living in Geneva, Switzerland decided to visit Serbia:

Telling people that I went to Serbia on holiday generally ensues a series of raised eyebrows and questioned intentions…Serbia is not the third world country that everyone imagines.

Yes, it’s not. Harriet Ruff enjoyed her holiday in Serbia and wrote a great blog post talking quite exclusively about Serbian food. It’s seems that the British woman loved Serbian food. Here is a short excerpt but read the whole blog post:

A palačinke is essentially a pancake or crêpe. Sweet or savoury but with a specific base. Savoury always comes with sour cream. It’s a great addition. And sweet are either a Nutella or Eurocrem base. Eurocrem is a sort of white chocolate and milk chocolate mixed spread. It’s delightful. Plazma are another Serbian great. Apparently biscuits for babies that everybody eats. They’re a cross between a rich tea biscuit and a digestive. Crumble that on a eurocrem palačinka and you are living the Serbian dream.

Yes, Serbian People Are Friendly

Yes, Serbian People Are Friendly

Yes, Serbian People Are Friendly

Jane, a British woman who runs RunawayJane.com, a site dedicated to giving tips and advice to young people travelling on a budget around the world, was recently in Novi Sad, Serbia’s second-largest city after Belgrade. She liked the city and the friendly local Serbian people:

Friendly local people

One thing in particular that really stood out to me while I was in Novi Sad was how friendly and helpful the local people were. Every time I went into a shop, bar, café, or restaurant, people made a real effort to talk to me beyond what you would expect. Even when their English wasn’t so good (and my Serbian was pretty much non-existent) they still tried and wanted to ask questions about where I came from, why I was in Novi Sad, and were keen to give me recommendations for the city. I stood out like a sore thumb at times as a tourist here as I wandered around trying to decipher street signs in the Cyrillic alphabet, but the people were always very helpful when I needed help or directions. In fact, it’s one of the most endearing things about the place.

That’s it. Serbian people are friendly and helpful. Welcome to Novi Sad. Welcome to Serbia. Well, read Jane’s post titled First Impressions of Novi Sad (Serbia) in full.

Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

Travel Tips For Serbia 2013

The women behind Nothing Against Serbia’s blog put yesterday an interesting blog post titled Travel tips for Serbia 2013. If you wish to have the best of the Serbian experience, read her post. Here is a short excerpt, but read the full blog post:

The Serbian eating style is something that delights tourists the most: it’s absolutely fantastic! In this overview about serbian food you find an explanation to all the dishes served in restaurants, a good guide to drinks and eating habits. (For vegetarians, well what to say? if you decide to eat meat once in your lifetime, do it in Serbia…)

Don't Trust People Saying That Serbia And Serbs Are Dangerous

Don’t Trust People Saying That Serbia And Serbs Are Dangerous

Don't Trust People Saying That Serbia And Serbs Are Dangerous

J. D. Riso, an American writer and former resident of Arizona, currently resides in Poznan, Poland, with her husband. When she told her Hungarian acquaintances that she was planning a short trip to Serbia, they told her that it was dangerous and that they’d steal from her. And her American friends said, “Wow, cool!” “with the instinctive cheerleader enthusiasm that means they’d never heard of Serbia.” Riso wrote. Well, this American woman was not afraid to come to visit Serbia alone (without her husband) and liked Belgrade “Belgrade is fabulous. Such vibrant energy.” she wrote in the comment section of her blog post. She even discovered that Serbian people don’t dislike American people:

When I walk in the door, the owner (of the hostel) offers to make me a cup of Turkish coffee. He asks about my day. I tell him that it was great, but he wants details. His expression is one of concern. He wants me to love Belgrade. I tell him what I saw, including the bombed out Ministry of Defense buildings, the result of an American-led NATO strike. “What do you think about Americans?” I ask. “You can be honest.” “The Americans that I’ve met are kind. It’s not right to judge an entire country for the actions of their government.” He looks at me for a long moment. “We are not like the Western media says we are.” I nod and look him in the eye. “I no longer just take the word of anyone about anything. Especially not the media’s.”

Well, don’t just read this short excerpt from J. D. Riso’s blog post titled An American Tourist in Serbia, read the whole thing. And, please, don’t trust people saying that Serbia is a dangerous country. It’s not true at all. Serbia is one of the safest countries in the world. The only risk: If you’re a man visiting Serbia, it’s to fall in love with a beautiful Serbian woman, and you will not want to leave Serbia. The same risk exists for a woman visiting Serbia. Serbian men are also tall and hot! All that said, again, don’t trust people saying that Serbia and Serbs are dangerous. Come to Serbia and meet the friendliest people in the world.

Serbia Is Open For Tourism

Serbia Is Open For Tourism

Serbia Is Open For Tourism

Marius and Joan, a British couple travelling around Europe in a motorhome, recently spent a few days in the Capital of Serbia, Belgrade. Marius and Joan founded Belgrade to be “a city full of life and sights to see“. In particular, they enjoyed Serbian food and Serbian hospitality:

We have not been to Serbia before, and because of the Balkan conflict after the break up of Yugoslavia, it has not always received a good press. How time can change things, because since our arrival a few days ago we have seen only good hospitality and service with a smile. Serbia is open for tourism!

Well, read the full story of Marius and Joan in Belgrade (with also some good pictures showing Belgrade). And yes, Serbia is open for tourism!

Belgrade - a vibrant and moving city
Visiting Serbia changed my life

One Month In Serbia Changed My Life

Visiting Serbia changed my life

Ferrero, a 20-year-old man from Singapore, who spent recently one month in Serbia, wrote a beautiful blog post explaining why his trip to Serbia was more than a “great experience” and that being with Serbian people changed his life. Here’s a short excerpt, but it’s worth reading the whole thing:

The essence of a place, however, can only be truly felt by interacting with as many locals as possible. I was blessed with a number of such opportunities. The Serbian youths who hosted us as volunteers – a few of them whom I later became very good friends with – brought life and a positive energy to the city. Without their hospitality and continuous efforts to spend time with us despite their busy schedules, I would never have understood what people meant when they said they loved Serbia.

At the end of his blog post Ferrero said “To those who have been and experienced, Srbija is no longer a foreign word with a strange pronunciation. It is, after all, Serbia.” That’s it.

Adam Daniel Mezei in Belgrade, Serbia